Going onstage (www.esplanade.com).

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Family Dance

I Kid You Not

#10 | THE ART OF BHARATANATYAM

Four young dancers show us the basics of bharatanatyam.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 14.06

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Family Dance

I Kid You Not

#9 | THE ART OF MALAY DANCE

Description Four dancers bust the moves of asli and zapin.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 10.34

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Family Music

I Kid You Not

#8 | THE ART OF CHINESE STRING INSTRUMENTS

Four young masters (of music) keep us on a string

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 16.30

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Family Music

I Kid You Not

#7 | THE ART OF INDIAN PERCUSSION

Four gurus break it down without skipping a beat.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 12.59

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Family Dance

I Kid You Not

#6 | ILHAM TEACHES INANG

When mischief meets mastery.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 02.42

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Family Dance

I Kid You Not

#5 | ILHAM ON INANG

Malay dance runs in his blood.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 02.51

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Family Music

I Kid You Not

#4 | HANNAH THE GUZHENG TEACHER

When the student becomes the teacher.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 02.51

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Family Music

I Kid You Not

#3 | HANNAH ON THE GUZHENG

Mastering the art of plucking strings.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 02.18

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Family Dance

I Kid You Not

#2 | DISHA TEACHES ODISSI

So you think you know odissi.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 02.46

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Family Dance

I Kid You Not

#1 | DISHA DISHES OUT ODISSI

Age is just a number.

Published: 21 Oct 2019

Duration: 02.42

Now Playing

#10 | THE ART OF BHARATANATYAM

14.06

Now Playing

#9 | THE ART OF MALAY DANCE

10.34

Now Playing

#8 | THE ART OF CHINESE STRING INSTRUMENTS

16.30

Now Playing

#7 | THE ART OF INDIAN PERCUSSION

12.59

Now Playing

#6 | ILHAM TEACHES INANG

02.42

Now Playing

#5 | ILHAM ON INANG

02.51

Now Playing

#4 | HANNAH THE GUZHENG TEACHER

02.51

Now Playing

#3 | HANNAH ON THE GUZHENG

02.18

Now Playing

#2 | DISHA TEACHES ODISSI

02.46

Now Playing

#1 | DISHA DISHES OUT ODISSI

02.42


Time taken : >15mins

#1 | DISHA DISHES OUT ODISSI

Creative mentors come in all ages and sizes.

 

Meet Disha, an odissi dancer who practices her moves at the void deck so that she doesn't disturb her neighbours downstairs when she stamps her feet. In this artist profile, we find out what it is about this ancient Indian classical dance form that gets ten-year-old Disha up and moving.


#2 | DISHA TEACHES ODISSI

Guru Disha? For sure.

Disha teaches adults the basics of odissi dance, and it's tougher than it looks. We kid you not.


#3 | HANNAH ON THE GUZHENG

Piano pieces on the guzheng?

We kid you not. Meet Hannah, a guzheng player whose dedication to the art of plucking these versatile strings has made her friends think she's a little overboard.


#4 | HANNAH THE GUZHENG TEACHER

The master keeps us on a string.

Hannah takes on the task of teaching three grown-ups how to play the guzheng – no strings attached.


#5 | ILHAM ON INANG

Born into Malay dance

All his siblings dance too, we kid you not. Meet Ilham (which means "inspiration" in Malay), whose passion for Malay dance runs through the entire family. Tune in as the little dynamite shares more about inang, one of the five basic traditional Malay dance forms in Singapore. 


#6 | ILHAM TEACHES INANG

When the mischief maker becomes the master

From bro to boss, Ilham teaches three grown-ups inang, one of the five traditional Malay dance forms in Singapore.


#7 | THE ART OF INDIAN PERCUSSION

In this episode, Dhruv and Siddhant make up team tabla, while Rithvik and Sriramanan (Sri, for short) pair up for the mridangam. Both ancient hand drums are rooted in Indian culture but what is the difference and why does it matter? Four mini gurus will take you through the drums’ distinct folk origins, and explain the differences between both drums. For instance, these drums actually represent two main schools of Indian classical music: the tabla for the Hindustani style of the North, the mridangam for the Carnatic music of the South. They will demystify the techniques they use, show you the basics and clear some of those misconceptions before ending with a short demonstration—all without missing a beat.

Tabla
Dhruv Khurana
Siddhant Ananthanarayanan

Mridangam
Rithvik Ganesh
Sriramanan Sathish Kumar

Through the music and instruments of varied cultures and traditions, kids understand more about people who come from different backgrounds, while reconnecting with their own roots. This opens their minds from a young age, showing them the unique ways in which others might see the world. As they grow up, the kids are able to observe and appreciate different points of view, allowing them to effectively navigate the diverse world we live in.


So it's important for young people to learn, because to be curious is a very good thing. It will help us know more about different cultures and their music and their rhythms.

Acknowledgement:

Special thanks to the adult gurus

Guru Mihir Kundu, SIFAS (Singapore Indian Fine Arts Society)

Mr Vighnesh Iyer, Beej Academy

Nawaz Mirajkar, Temple of Fine Arts


#8 | THE ART OF CHINESE STRING INSTRUMENTS

In this episode, Justus and Yi Ming pair up to talk about the erhu, while Anne and Marianne show you the ropes (or should we say strings?) for playing the pipa and yanqin respectively. The four young masters take you all the way back in time to the Silk Road and the Tang dynasty when the pipa and erhu were first introduced to China, and when the yangqin first appeared some 400 years ago. They'll also show you nifty techniques and basics, while explaining how Chinese instruments have an uncanny ability to mimic different types of sounds of nature, animals, even battle, and evoke emotions—sadness, excitement, longing and so forth. The kids wind things up with the performance of a specially arranged folk song titled Jasmine Flower 《茉莉花》.

Erhu
Justus Teh
Li Yi Ming

Pipa
Anne Altorfer-Ong

Yangqin
Marianne Wang

Through the music and instruments of varied cultures and traditions, kids understand more about people who come from different backgrounds, while reconnecting with their own roots. This opens their minds from a young age, showing them the unique ways in which others might see the world. As they grow up, the kids are able to observe and appreciate different points of view, allowing them to effectively navigate the diverse world we live in.


...music is not really something you have to learn but you can feel emotions just by listening to it.

Acknowledgement:

Special thanks to

Kok Jun Phang

 

Singapore National Youth Chinese Orchestra (SNYCO)


#9 | THE ART OF MALAY DANCE

In this episode, Maisarah and Sharifah team up to talk about asli, while Aleesyah and Sarah give us an introduction to zapin. The four young dancers trace the origins of two out of five—other styles are inang, masri and joget—traditional Malay dance forms, which are all hundreds of years old. Zapin is a fast-paced dance that is heavily influenced by other cultures and was once only danced by men, while asli is a slow, graceful dance that originated from the Malay peninsula, typically accompanied by pantun (poems). The girls demonstrate basic techniques that cut across different traditional styles and explain the key differences in asli and zapin, finishing with a flourish—a performance of both styles of dance.

Asli
Maisarah Rifqah Bte Mus Iskandar
Sharifah Auni Imaan Bte Syed Abdul Rahman

Zapin
Aleesya Nadya Puteri Bte Muhammad Azim
Sarah Atikah Bte Aminuddin

Through the music and instruments of varied cultures and traditions, kids understand more about people who come from different backgrounds, while reconnecting with their own roots. This opens their minds from a young age, showing them the unique ways in which others might see the world. As they grow up, the kids are able to observe and appreciate different points of view, allowing them to effectively navigate the diverse world we live in.

Catch Muara Festival, Singapore’s annual gathering of Malay dance practitioners and enthusiasts, online from 29 Oct – 27 Dec 2021. Watch the first day of the livestream performances here.


Art is a very interesting and fun way to get to know other cultures. We don't really have to explain; once you see [it], you can just feel it.

Acknowledgement:

Special thanks to

Sriwana

Q'aisya Shukor

Fauzi Anwar

Aziela Rahim

Asmida Kasim

Fauziah Hanom Yusof


#10 | THE ART OF BHARATANATYAM

In this final episode of I Kid You Not Season 2, Anandita, Ananya, Maya and Nishikaa tell us about the essence of one of the oldest forms of classical dance, bharatanatyam. The four gurus deconstruct bharatanatyam into its basic elements and also demonstrate the navarasas, which are the nine emotions that can be conveyed through classical Indian dance. We end with the experts performing an excerpt of Kalinga Nathanam, or the Kalinga dance, which is a story about Krishna who battles with a giant snake and subdues it, eventually emerging from the river dancing atop the hood of the serpent.

Dancers:
Anandita Kishore
Ananya Pai
Maya Senthi
Nishikaa Muthukrishnan

Through the music and instruments of varied cultures and traditions, kids understand more about people who come from different backgrounds, while reconnecting with their own roots. This opens their minds from a young age, showing them the unique ways in which others might see the world. As they grow up, the kids are able to observe and appreciate different points of view, allowing them to effectively navigate the diverse world we live in.


The bharatanatyam dancer is essentially a story-teller; art is more than just words and the dancers' job is to let the whole body speak

Acknowledgement:

Special thanks to

Meera Balasubramanian

Kalpavriksha Fine Arts Ltd


Find out how you can use these videos from I Kid You Not in the classroom. Browse through these educator's guides for more.

I Kid You Not
I Kid You Not features kids who are experts in different art forms, where they perform, play, teach and call the shots.